Repot Your Plants

Spring cleaning does not just involve cleaning your home, but it requires crucial maintenance for your plants. When springtime rolls around, it is important to take a look at your plants’ health. Plants should be transferred to larger pots to help their growth. The larger pot will assist your plants in getting its key nutrients and bring back any color it may have lost. You will need to take a look at your plant’s health and decide if it needs repotting. Some plants can go a couple years without repotting, but others may need more attention and up-keeping. 


Your Supply List: 

  • A plant
  • Large Pot (should be approximately 2 inches larger than your original pot)
  • Soil 
  • Water 


How to repot your plant:

  1. Consider your work environment. 

Repotting a plant can get messy quickly, consider taking your plant outdoors to work on repotting it. 

  • ONLY take your plant outside if it is warm enough because indoor plants can go into “shock” if exposed to low temperatures. 
  • Never place your indoor plants outdoors during cold months. 

2.  Remove your plant. 

In order to properly remove your plant, you will need to flip the pot upside and lightly take hold the plant’s stem. Once you have the plant’s stem in your hand, pull the plant out by its stem. 

3. Begin to add soil to the new pot. 

Cover the bottom of your larger pot with potting soil, but leave room for your plant.

4. Place your plant in the larger pot. 

5. Sprinkle more soil into the pot.

6. Water your repotted plant often.

7. Keep an eye on your plant for about a week. 

Your plant just changed homes, let it recuperate. Keep an eye out to make sure it handles the move well. 


Ultimately, repotting your plants is great for the plant as well as you. Dull plants can be a bit of an eyesore. Always keep an eye on your plants to see how they are growing in their new home. Your newly repotted plants should avoid direct sunlight for about a week and a half.